Transparency and the TTIP negotiations. A critique of the common sense

A couple of months ago, Matthias Fekl, the French State Secretary of Trade, gave a talk at UC Berkeley in which he threatened to abort the TTIP negotiations due to its massive lack in transparency. The claim that transparency would foster trust and secure a better outcome of democratic processes is now very common. In … Continue reading Transparency and the TTIP negotiations. A critique of the common sense

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Dierentalenpolitiek

14 September 2016 by Eva Meijer

© Eva Meijer De oude Griekse filosoof Aristoteles verbond de grenzen van de taal met die van de politieke gemeenschap. Hij dacht dat alleen mensen spreken, en dat mensen daarom de enige dieren zijn die een onderscheid kunnen maken tussen goed en kwaad. Omdat ze dat onderscheid kunnen maken, uitgedrukt in mensentaal, vormen ze een … Continue reading Dierentalenpolitiek

Contested Toleration

24 August 2016 by Michael Kühler

Toleration appears to be of prime importance for peaceful coexistence. This holds especially in modern, pluralistic societies, which are characterized by a plurality of cultural values and ways of life and in which not everyone agrees with the values and ways of life of all others. Accordingly, it seems that the state should be tolerant … Continue reading Contested Toleration

The Idea of a Common World: Ada Ushpiz’s “Vita Activa: The Spirit of Hannah Arendt”

1 June 2016 by Kathleen B. Jones

All photographs courtesy of Zeitgeist Films and the Hannah Arendt Private Archive. All rights reserved. FOUR YEARS AGO, Margarethe von Trotta’s biopic, Hannah Arendt, offered a sympathetic, though not especially innovative, cinematic portrait of the controversial 20th century-political theorist, whose occasionally inflammatory writing often made her the subject of scathing criticism. Ali Arikan noted in … Continue reading The Idea of a Common World: Ada Ushpiz’s “Vita Activa: The Spirit of Hannah Arendt”

Exploitation of African Wildlife: A Call for a New Global Conservation Ethics

18 May 2016 by Julius Kapembwa

Wild animals in Africa are in the international news almost every day. Usually this is for the reasons that these nonhuman animals, also called wildlife, are exploited as individuals and threatened as species. To say wild animals are exploited implicitly admits that some issues related to nonhuman animals are moral issues. Morality, as was already … Continue reading Exploitation of African Wildlife: A Call for a New Global Conservation Ethics

Privacy vs. Security: Snowden’s Legacy

11 May 2016 by Arthur Goemans

Privacy is a delicate issue, and the debate on data protection is complicated even though seemingly everyone has the same desire: as much privacy as possible, combined with as much security as possible. Finding an equilibrium is an incredibly difficult challenge for governments, intergovernmental organizations and non-state actors around the world. In April, a Regulation[1] … Continue reading Privacy vs. Security: Snowden’s Legacy

From Politics of Science to Evidence-Based Activism

1 May 2016 by Massimiliano Simons

Any method of management that implies the supposition-anticipation-suggestion of stupidity or infantilism of the individuals that constitute this society should be excluded; for, if they are defined as stupid or infantile, democracy itself can only be defined as manipulation, a modern new way of leading the flock. (Stengers & Ralet, 1997: 223) Can there be … Continue reading From Politics of Science to Evidence-Based Activism

Podemos’ shift of the political landscape in Spain: the emancipation of the ‘demos’

24 April 2016 by Esperanza Morales-López and Nicolina Montesano-Montessori

In a previous article, we analyzed the discursive creativity of the Spanish ‘Occupy’ movement that spontaneously came into existence in the squares of many Spanish cities (see Montesano-Montessori & Morales-López, 2015). The movement manifested itself in the main squares of Madrid and Barcelona on 15 May 2011 and then spread to other Spanish cities. The … Continue reading Podemos’ shift of the political landscape in Spain: the emancipation of the ‘demos’

With Syria in turmoil, little Lebanon remains in limbo

14 April 2016 by Thomas Thielemans

Five years into the Syrian crisis and with an all-out war on its doorstep, Lebanon is experiencing ever-worsening repercussions of its neighbour’s collapse. Yet the small country remains resilient, despite the influx of a million Syrian refugees, the regional turmoil, current tensions over a vacant presidency, and the fact that its institutions are barely functioning. … Continue reading With Syria in turmoil, little Lebanon remains in limbo

The Europhile Threat to European Political Integration

6 April 2016 by Jan Pieter Beetz

The financial-economic and migrant crises exacerbate anti-European sentiments. Populist movements across Europe have become electorally successful. One of their central manifesto pledges is to take their country out of the European Union (EU or Union) or at least bring sovereign powers back to the nation-state. Their narrative is often that the national elite have given … Continue reading The Europhile Threat to European Political Integration

Terrorism in Europe: The decade-long struggle over European banking data and a policy paradox

12 March 2016 by Mara Wesseling

After the terrorist attacks on Charlie Hebdo and the Paris attacks of 13 November, the demand to reconsider the creation of a European equivalent of the US Terrorist Finance Tracking Program (TFTP) – an investigative tool using international banking data to trace terrorists (financiers) and prevent future attacks– resurfaced. In response to these demands, the … Continue reading Terrorism in Europe: The decade-long struggle over European banking data and a policy paradox

Historical reflections on the current refugee crisis

25 February 2016 by Idesbald Goddeeris

From a historical perspective, the current refugee crisis in Europe is not entirely unprecedented. In this article, which is an authorized transcript of a KU Leuven Metaforum lecture, I will first make some observations on migration and try to answer the question to what extent the current wave today is exceptional. Secondly, I will reflect … Continue reading Historical reflections on the current refugee crisis

The Rise of Energy Citizens

14 February 2016 by Josquin Debaz

Introducing the French national debate on energy transition in 2012, its “facilitator”, Laurence Tubiana called not to oppose centralization against decentralization: Far from a centralized vision that has been ours until now, energy is nowadays perceived also as a local question, where everyone, as explains the economist Jeremy Rifkin, could be producer and consumer. […] … Continue reading The Rise of Energy Citizens